Learn How To Sing: BELT Without Straining

HI IVOREEZ Singers.  I’ve got Craig form Shimizu Voice with a super useful tip about  how to belt high without straining.   His tips are easy to visualize and use. Check them out here:

Now, there are all kinds of ways to develop belting and it really depends (upon) where you started from. Some people, they have been screaming loud so that means they sound strong, although not strong, not in a good way. But they have well-developed vocal folds. Other people are still too breathy. And so if you are still too breathy when you are singing, you are going to have to learn some other things to develop a more powerful voice. So, it all depends on where you are at to learn how to belt correctly. So, this technique for learning how to sing high is the one I like to use.

When I don’t have a lot of time to practice but I have a song that has a couple high parts that I have to belt…of course, without screaming, then this is the technique I use. It’s called the cry in the voice. And it’s what it sounds like. Like that little introduction there, it’s a crying sound that you use. And I am kind of surprised that some people can’t make that sound.

So, if you can’t make this crying sound, then, um, you probably have to skip this video. And go to another technique to help you belt. What’s the value of this sound that I’m making right now? If you look at my adam’s apple, my larynx, when I get sad, the adam’s apple drops. One of the important things that you should learn about singing, to control your adam’a apple, your larynx, that you don’t want it to be moving up while you aree singing. And being sad controls that. The other great thing that the cry in the voice does is that it puts the vocal folds into a particular position that’s a little lighter but air-efficient.

And that’s what you want to do to be able to belt without straining. You must reduce the airflow. Velocity is high, but the volume of air must be reduced because that’s the main thing that causes strain. So what does it sound like? One of the requests I had is, if I could cover the song, The Show Must Go On by Queen. And I said okay, I’ll do it, not realizing that that’s a B. He has to sing…he sings a B up there. SHOW MUST go on.  I’m trying to do the B with a full chest voice. Next option is a head voice. That’s no good. So now, if I apply the cry to that chest sound.  The thinning of the vocal folds allows me to get up there without killing myself or blasting your ear drums out.

It changes the over-heavy, over-compressed chest voice into a little lighter sound.  Yes, it is a mix, it is a mixed tone, but this is a little easier to generate if you can be sad. Sob, sob. If you can be sad. The other nice thing that the cry does…when you’re singing in your head voice or falsetto, if you apply sadness to it, the vocal folds will close…

A little more. Thereby transforming the sound closer to a more resonant, clear, meaty sound that has less air coming out. I’m going to apply a little bit of sadness to that.  And the head voice, falsetto is transformed to a little more meaty sound. Let me apply a little more. Sort of like a wail.  That’s applying the cry to change the head voice or falsetto sound into more of a belt sound. Now the first time I heard the cry in the voice, it was to learn how to bridge the gap, the transition zone, the passaggio.

Just at that point where you’re going to break, you’re going to crack, you apply some of the cry to that. Right at that point. And you keep applying the cry as much as you need it to keep the voice from opening up, letting the air out and going into your head or falsetto. Apply the cry. The other thing that the cry in the voice is just terrific for is that it gives your voice a lot of color…texture.

So that’s without it. If I add a little cry to it.  If I apply a little more.  I just love this technique because you can use it on a one-to-ten scale, where the ten would be out of control wailing. And, of course, the zero or one would be nothing, dead feeling. And then the cry, about the middle, about a five, you would have this texture to it.

So I’m just a little bit sad, but not noticeably. But this color, the texture, when you sing, the sound just becomes a little more interesting to listen to. And so you have to practice it on that one to ten scale just how much of that cry you want to allow to be heard. But, as this video is about, whenever you’re getting up there, or you know that you’re just screaming, then apply some cry to it just to back it off.  So you can here there’s a little more brightness to the voice. And then I feel a lot better. That’s one of main things that I use it for so I can consistently produce a high tone without using my throat. So that’s the cry in the voice. Great for learning how to belt high without killing yourself, great for working on your transition, your break.

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Learn How To Sing: BELT (Sing Loud) Without Straining - LESSON 9 - Craig Shimizu Voice

Learn How To Sing: BELT (Sing Loud) Without Straining - LESSON 9 - Craig Shimizu Voice
http://www.shimizuvoice.com

This video is about learning how to sing high and loud or belting effortlessly by using the cry in the voice.

:30 Hi, this is Craig from Shimizu Voice and today’s lesson is about how to belt high without straining.

:38 On my youtube channel, someone asked what is the most effective technique to use to belt high.

:44 Now, there’s all kinds of ways to develop belting and it really depends (upon) where you’re starting from. Some people, they’ve been screaming loud so that means they’re strong, although not strong, not in a good way. But they have well-developed vocal folds.

1:04 Other people are still too breathy. And so if you’re still too breathy when you’re singing, you’re going to have to learn some other things to develop a more powerful voice. So, it all depends on where you’re at to learn how to belt correctly.

1:18 So, this technique for learning how to sing high is the one I like to use. When I don’t have a lot of time to practice but I have a song that has a couple high parts that I have to belt...of course, without screaming, then this is the technique I use. It’s called the cry in the voice. And it’s what it sounds like. Like that little introduction there, it’s a crying sound that you use.

1:44 And I’m kind of surprised that some people can’t make that sound. So, if you can’t make this crying sound, then, um, you probably have to skip this video. And go to another technique to help you belt.

2:02 What’s the value of this sound that I’m making right now? If you look at my adam’s apple, my larynx, when I get sad, the adam’s apple drops.

2:04 One of the important things that you should learn about singing, to control your adam’s apple, your larynx, that you don’t want it to be moving up while you’re singing. And being sad controls that.

2:23 The other great thing that the cry in the voice does is that it puts the vocal folds into a particular position that’s a little lighter but air-efficient.
And that’s what you want to do to be able to belt without straining. You must reduce the airflow. Velocity is high, but the volume of air must be reduced because that’s the main thing that causes strain.

2:48 So what does it sound like? One of the requests I had is, if I could cover the song, “The Show Must Go On” by Queen. And I said okay, I’ll do it, not realizing that that’s a “B”. He has to sing...he sings a “B” up there.

3:07 “SHOW MUST…” I’m trying to do the “B” with a full chest voice.
Next option is a head voice. “Show must go on”. That’s no good.

3:28 So now, if I apply the cry to that chest sound. “Show must go on”. The thinning of the vocal folds allows me to get up there without killing myself or blasting your ear drums out. “Show must go on”.

3:40 It changes the over-heavy, over-compressed chest voice into a little lighter sound.

4:00 The other nice thing that the cry does...when you’re singing in your head voice or falsetto, if you apply sadness to it, the vocal folds will close... a little more. Thereby transforming the sound closer to a more resonant, clear, meaty sound that has less air coming out.

4:43 Sort of like a wail. “Show must go on”. That’s applying the cry to change a head voice more of a belt sound.

4:54 Using the cry to bridge the gap, the transition zone, the passaggio, cracking.

5:42 Using the cry for singing with feeling.

6:15 I just love this technique because you can use it on a one-to-ten scale, where the ten would be out of control wailing. And, of course, the zero or one would be nothing, dead feeling. But this color, the texture, when you sing, the sound just becomes a little more interesting to listen to. And so you have to practice it on that one to ten scale just how much of that cry you want to allow to be heard.

6:50 But, as this video is about, whenever you’re getting up there, or you know that you’re just screaming, then apply some cry to it just to back it off.

That’s one of main things that I use it for so I can consistently produce a high tone without using my throat.

7:29 So that’s the cry in the voice. Great for learning how to belt high without killing yourself, great for working on your transition, your break. And great for expression.